Physical Education Curriculum & Software #QPE

Posts tagged ‘sports’

Instant Activities

instant-activities

Our goal at Focused Fitness is to provide resources and programs to help ALL students stay healthy, fit, and active for a lifetime. Our goal cannot be attained without teachers, schools, districts, and states buying into Quality Physical Education (#QPE). #QPE consists of 4 components: 1-Fitness, 2-Motor Skills, 3-Social/Emotional Health, and 4-Fitness and Health Academic Content.

We are a company that was built by teachers, for teachers. We know that money is ALWAYS an issue in #physed. So, below are 4 FREE instant activities because we love and appreciate all you do for kids! We love feedback, so feel free to contact us at (smile@focusedfitness.org). Have fun!

Rock, Paper, Scissors Gold Medal:

          Objective: Cardiorespiratory endurance, problem-solving, and cooperation

            Equipment: None

Game Set-up: The gym will be divided into three sections using the lines on the floor. One end of the gym will be the beginning area considered Bronze Medal, half court will be considered Silver Medal and the other end of the gym will be Gold Medal.

How to Play: The students will find a partner to start the game at the Bronze Medal area of the gym. Once a student wins the round at Bronze Medal they will move to the middle of the gym to play someone in the Silver Medal area. From Silver Medal area students will move either to the Gold Medal area if they win or return to the Bronze Medal area if they lose. If they win in the Silver Medal area, the student will move to the Gold Medal area and play someone in the Gold Medal round.  If the student wins in the Gold Medal area, they won a gold medal and remain to play someone else that makes it to the Gold Medal area. If the student loses in the Gold Medal area, that student will return to the Silver Medal area to play another student in that area.  Play continues for a designated amount of time.

Push Up Tag

          Objective: Muscular Strength and Muscular Endurance

            Equipment: None

How to Play: Students partner up and get into a push up position, facing each other. One person is “it.” The player who is “it” tries to tag the other student’s hands. Once tagged, the roles are reversed.

Toss and Jog

          Objective: Cardiorespiratory Endurance, motor skills

            Equipment: foam footballs or small foam balls

Directions: Students jog the perimeter of the gym or designated space. Meanwhile 2-3 students are in the center of the gym, each with a football. Students in the center toss the footballs to people jogging on the outside. Students who catch the footballs switch places with students in the middle and now toss the balls to someone else.

Variations: Use lateral passes, two handed lateral passes, small foam balls or any ball of teacher’s choice.

Hit the Deck

          Objective: Cardiorespiratory Endurance, motor skills

            Equipment: Decks of playing cards, cones, station cards

Directions: Each wall in the gym represents a different suit in a deck of playing cards. Each suit represents a different exercise. The teacher needs to create station cards for each wall. For example: Heart= Jumping Jacks, Spade= Squats, Diamond= Crab Toe Touches, Club= Squat Thrusts. Spread the cards out face down in the center of the gym. Students run one lap around the gym then go to the middle and pick a card. Then they go the wall that represents their suit. The card number represents how many repetitions they do of that exercise. For example: If a student draws a 4 of hearts, they do 4 jumping jacks. Face cards are worth 10.

Imaginary Rope Jumping:

Objective: Creativity, cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength and muscular endurance, coordination, and agility

            Equipment: Music

How to Play: Holding an imaginary jump rope, all students stand in their own exercise spot, evenly spread out through the gym. Start the music and begin jumping.  Use your imagination and create crazy ways to jump or the teacher can lead the routine for younger students. The idea is that you can’t mess up so you just keep jumping for 30 seconds, 1 minute or longer intervals.

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How to Keep Kids Motivated to Stay Active

trike

By: Brandon Capaletti

How To Keep Kids Motivated To Stay Active

When your students come to physical education class, are they enthusiastic, or do they trudge in, fearing what impossible task they will be asked to perform? Motivating students in the physical education classroom is not necessarily easy, but it can be done! Here are some tips that will help you spark an interest in all of your students, even those who are not naturally athletic.

  1. Introduce the Unit Well

The key to keeping kids engaged throughout a unit — regardless of the topic covered — is introducing the unit well. Physical education instructors should view the beginning of the unit as their chance to “sell” the content. This involves a couple of steps: First, teachers need to provide an overview of what students will be learning and doing, and why it’s important. Then, the introduction should include what the teacher will be asking the students to accomplish. This helps those who are not naturally interested in physical education become engaged, because they know what is expected of them when assessment time comes.

After the introduction, the teacher should check for understanding. Asking the students what they will do when certain events in the game happen, for example, will show that they grasp the task at hand. The teacher can also check for understanding by asking for a physical movement, such as “show me a defensive basketball stance.”

  1. Break Down the Skill

Consider a unit on baseball. Perhaps a hitter’s stance and hitting the ball is natural to you after years of playing baseball. That does not mean it comes naturally to your students, however. In fact, many of your students have probably never held a bat.

To ensure that they are excited and engaged, show them the process, then break it down — part by part. Demonstrate where to put the feet, how to position the back, where to place the arms, and how to hit the ball. By going over each step, you improve the chances that your students are able to attempt and achieve success with the task — regardless of ability level.

  1. Don’t Yell

No matter how frustrated you may feel with your students, avoid the temptation to yell at them. This may appear effective on TV shows or movies, but the teacher who wants to inspire needs to find intrinsic motivators for students, not scream at them.

kids on bikes

  1. Use Cues Appropriately

Cues are helpful in physical education, but they can be overwhelming. When teaching a new skill, provide one to three cues at a time, keeping them short and simple. They should be something students can remember when they are working through the action you are teaching. You can have students say the cues while performing the skill, but keep it as simple as possible — until the skill or task has been fully learned.

  1. Provide Directed Free Time

One way to keep kids engaged is to give them directed free time. Free time does not mean they can do whatever they want on the field or the gym, but it does mean that they can practice whatever skill, from the skill set or game, they want. By watching your students during this directed free time, you can see what areas of the game naturally appeal to them. You can motivate them by allowing them to pursue excellence in those areas.

  1. Don’t Overdo Your Instruction

As a physical education teacher, you are probably in good physical shape. That does not mean your students are, however. Your students come from a wide range of backgrounds and family situations, and some will be in poor shape. Teachers who are passionate about health may feel tempted to push these children hard to get them in better shape. This can derail motivation. Physical activity should not hurt your students. While some students do need a push to be active, push gently and with plenty of encouragement for success, rather than making a grueling routine that will cause physical pain.

  1. Reward All Success

Do you have some students who can’t make a layup to save their life? Then reward and praise them for a solid bounce pass. Find out where your students are, then provide motivators and rewards for the advances they make, even if they are not at the level you wish they were. Remember, encouragement is one of the greatest motivators a teacher has, so use it liberally.

Physical education is unique in the education world because it does not involve studying, letter grades, papers and calculations. It involves the physical body. Ultimately, you will need to carefully prompt your students so they are encouraged to keep striving for success

About the Author:

Brandon Capaletti is the Vice President of Cisco Athletic, a Maryland-based athletic apparel manufacturer of custom uniforms.  Cisco makes jerseys for 18 different sports, including volleyball, basketball, and baseball.

 

 

#MoveInMay: National Fitness & Sports Month

Group Of Children Running In Park

By: Cherie Harrington

Welcome to the month of May!  In my world this means: Cinco de Mayo celebration, Mothers’ Day, parades, birthdays, holiday, hiking, yard work, picnics, kayaking and more J

Speaking of May – the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services has dubbed May as the National Physical Fitness and Sports Month.  They want us to make physical activity part of our life! My opinion of the us? It means everyone between the ages of 2 – 99+ years.

If you are already physically active, I want to ask you how often you change it up. How often do you talk to your students about altering their physical activity? My goal this month is to participate in 2-3 different activities – step out of my box and my “normal exercise environment.”  To you, the social media audience, I commit to complete the following activities prior to June 1st:  pull out- buckle up-cover some distance on my roller blades, experience hitting golf balls and probably chasing quite a few of them down, and get wet with swimming indoors.

My challenge to you – try 2 different activities this month.  Yes, it’s alright if the time you spend being active is something you have participated in, but not for quite some time.  Here are a few options: archery, Frisbee, racquetball, juggling, dancing (ballroom, line, folk or square), boxing, jump rope, yoga, kickball, arm cycling, rock climbing and bicycling.  Please stay safe, but have fun!

Share your experiences in the comments below this entire month. I am super excited to hear how you ensure that May truly is the National Physical Fitness and Sports Month.

Apollos Hester- It’s an attitude…

Apollos Hester is an inspired high school Football player. In his post-game interview with Lauren Mickler he talks about football and life. This young man is happy, healthy, and always smilin’!

OFFTHEFIELD.com

Mike Akana is the owner and founder of OFFTHEFIELD.com. He has had experience working with the Five for Life Program in Caldwell, ID. In this video he describes OTF (OFFTHEFIELD.com) as well as his experience with Focused Fitness. Check out OFFTHEFIELD.com today!