Physical Education Curriculum & Software #QPE

Alex O’Brien asks two students to fill out a WELNET® Activity Log without giving them any other instruction. In the above video we see how easy it is for students to log and track their activity.

WELNET® was the first web-based software program for Health and Physical Education, and still the most comprehensive software available. If you are interested in demoing this powerful software in your school or district CLICK HERE and watch your physical education program continue to grow. Mostly importantly, you will be able to solidify that your program is showing student growth in health and fitness concepts, as well as overall physical literacy.

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Dr. Schuler emphasizes the connection between spinal health and genetics. He outlines four great ways to help promote a healthy spine including, avoidance of nicotine, maintaining appropriate conditioning, using proper ergonomics, as well as maintaining a healthy body weight and nutritional intake.

Video created by the Virginia Spine Institute

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By: Brandon Capaletti

How To Keep Kids Motivated To Stay Active

When your students come to physical education class, are they enthusiastic, or do they trudge in, fearing what impossible task they will be asked to perform? Motivating students in the physical education classroom is not necessarily easy, but it can be done! Here are some tips that will help you spark an interest in all of your students, even those who are not naturally athletic.

  1. Introduce the Unit Well

The key to keeping kids engaged throughout a unit — regardless of the topic covered — is introducing the unit well. Physical education instructors should view the beginning of the unit as their chance to “sell” the content. This involves a couple of steps: First, teachers need to provide an overview of what students will be learning and doing, and why it’s important. Then, the introduction should include what the teacher will be asking the students to accomplish. This helps those who are not naturally interested in physical education become engaged, because they know what is expected of them when assessment time comes.

After the introduction, the teacher should check for understanding. Asking the students what they will do when certain events in the game happen, for example, will show that they grasp the task at hand. The teacher can also check for understanding by asking for a physical movement, such as “show me a defensive basketball stance.”

  1. Break Down the Skill

Consider a unit on baseball. Perhaps a hitter’s stance and hitting the ball is natural to you after years of playing baseball. That does not mean it comes naturally to your students, however. In fact, many of your students have probably never held a bat.

To ensure that they are excited and engaged, show them the process, then break it down — part by part. Demonstrate where to put the feet, how to position the back, where to place the arms, and how to hit the ball. By going over each step, you improve the chances that your students are able to attempt and achieve success with the task — regardless of ability level.

  1. Don’t Yell

No matter how frustrated you may feel with your students, avoid the temptation to yell at them. This may appear effective on TV shows or movies, but the teacher who wants to inspire needs to find intrinsic motivators for students, not scream at them.

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  1. Use Cues Appropriately

Cues are helpful in physical education, but they can be overwhelming. When teaching a new skill, provide one to three cues at a time, keeping them short and simple. They should be something students can remember when they are working through the action you are teaching. You can have students say the cues while performing the skill, but keep it as simple as possible — until the skill or task has been fully learned.

  1. Provide Directed Free Time

One way to keep kids engaged is to give them directed free time. Free time does not mean they can do whatever they want on the field or the gym, but it does mean that they can practice whatever skill, from the skill set or game, they want. By watching your students during this directed free time, you can see what areas of the game naturally appeal to them. You can motivate them by allowing them to pursue excellence in those areas.

  1. Don’t Overdo Your Instruction

As a physical education teacher, you are probably in good physical shape. That does not mean your students are, however. Your students come from a wide range of backgrounds and family situations, and some will be in poor shape. Teachers who are passionate about health may feel tempted to push these children hard to get them in better shape. This can derail motivation. Physical activity should not hurt your students. While some students do need a push to be active, push gently and with plenty of encouragement for success, rather than making a grueling routine that will cause physical pain.

  1. Reward All Success

Do you have some students who can’t make a layup to save their life? Then reward and praise them for a solid bounce pass. Find out where your students are, then provide motivators and rewards for the advances they make, even if they are not at the level you wish they were. Remember, encouragement is one of the greatest motivators a teacher has, so use it liberally.

Physical education is unique in the education world because it does not involve studying, letter grades, papers and calculations. It involves the physical body. Ultimately, you will need to carefully prompt your students so they are encouraged to keep striving for success

About the Author:

Brandon Capaletti is the Vice President of Cisco Athletic, a Maryland-based athletic apparel manufacturer of custom uniforms.  Cisco makes jerseys for 18 different sports, including volleyball, basketball, and baseball.

 

 

Erie Newsletter

 

We have had the privilege of working with Erie Public Schools over the last two years in the implementation of their Carol M. White PEP Grant. We have seen their physical education department make incredible strides towards teaching their students what it means to be physically and health literate. In using the FIVE FOR LIFE® Curriculum, as well as, the FAB 5® Curriculum and WELNET® the district has come to know what it means to educate students in Quality Physical Education (#QPE). We’ve included the latest edition of Erie Public Schools newsletter “Curriculum Matters”. Go to pages 4 and 5 to see how their physical education department has been progressing and how their using Focused Fitness resources in their pursuit of #QPE!

View Newsletter –> Volume 3 Issue 2

Letter to you…

@alexobrien wants to spark a reaction in you. #physed

Living Active

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The following poem, written by a person that may never be known, is not important.

What is important, is how you react to the poem…

The poem will be introduced by a small statement, in order to ignite inspiration (assuming inspiration is flamable) in you.

The Statement: ‘Listen more to learn more.’

What is a middle schooler?

I was asked one day.

I knew what he was,

but what should I say?

He is noise and confusion.

He is silence that is deep.

He is sunshine and laughter,

or a cloud that will wait.

He is swift as an arrow.

He is a waster of time.

He wants to be rich,

but he cannot save a dime.

He is rude and nasty.

He is polite as can be.

He wants parental guidance,

but fights to be free.

He’s aggressive and bossy.

He is timid and shy.

He knows all the answers,

View original post 67 more words

fireworks

As we head back to school, embarking on the 2016 year, we might be asked by our friends, family, kids, and co-workers one or more of the following questions:

  • How was your winter break?
  • What did you do for fun?
  • How was new years?
  • Are you excited for this year?

As we answer these questions and more, we might feel a little lump in our throats when we are asked the inevitable, “What’s your New Year’s resolution?” That lump is not uncommon. New Year’s resolutions are hard to make, and even harder to keep. One reason for this is our resolutions can often be a little vague. For example, “I want to exercise more.” might ring a bell. Well, this year we have no need to worry about a lump in our throat because our New Year’s resolution is going to be a smart and successful one! It will be well planned, thought through, and time sensitive…here’s how.

We are going to make sure it is a SMART-Goal. A SMART-Goal is specific, measurable, attainable, realistic, and timely. Let’s break down each piece of what a SMART-Goal is made up of with the help of SMART Goal Man!

It’s not going to be easy, but we are ready for the challenge of being a happier, healthier version of ourselves this year! Happy New Year and here’s to a SMART 2016!

questions

By: Ron Malm

I often wonder what has become of Jacob, even though it has been 15 years since he was a student in my physical education class back at Franklin Elementary. It seems odd to me that I would be wondering about Jacob when I taught thousands of students over the course of my career, but I just can’t shake the impact Jacob had on me professionally.

Jacob frustrated me to no end. He was one of the smartest students I ever had the privilege to teach, but Jacob was LAZY! Have you not had a lazy student or two in your career? A typical day teaching Jacob’s class had him entering the gym and choosing to walk during our instant activity, pretend to be doing exercises when we were doing circuits and move at 1/100th the speed of the other students when we were doing a large group activity. I could have understood if the instant activity was lame, the exercises were too technical and the activity was ultra competitive, but not mine! All one had to do is look at all the students laughing, breathing hard and sweating to realize my class was the “place to be”… for most of the students.

In reality, Jacob was far from lazy… he simply saw no relevance in the activities, lessons and units in my PE class to HIS life.  Jacob, like other students in school had already figured out that he was not the fastest, strongest or most coordinated kid on the block and therefore saw no purpose in trying to scale the traverse wall, jump rope or practice his forehand striking with a racquet. Many of the activities I planned for the students did not resonate in Jacob’s life outside of school. Certainly there were other “Jacobs” (Students that had already given up on the physical aspect of life, but faked it and “flew under the radar”).

I think about Jacob often. I think about him because I fear that my blind spots got the better of me more than I care to admit. It was not hard for me to watch students throwing and immediately see the baseball players among them, yet I was blind to the students that saw no purpose in my teaching. I think about Jacob because he pushed me to SEE physical education and physical activity from HIS perspective.

If it doesn’t connect with all the students, then why are we teaching it? I often hear, “because it is good for them”. Sure, it is good for them. It is good for them the same way feeding your own kids vegetables, but if they don’t understand how it relates to them, it is worthless. Everybody deserves the right to be taught the WHY and not just the what, and how.

If you want to find out if your teaching is connecting with your students, I challenge you to give them an anonymous survey asking for their feedback. They will tell you. You may not like what they say, but honest feedback is rarely fun to hear. Although if your goal is to get better, then “SUCK IT UP, BUTTERCUP!” and do what you know you must. Find YOUR Jacob. He exists in all of our classes, you just have to look for him.

If I ever run into Jacob, I will share with him that he pushed me as a physical education teacher more than any other student ever did. He pushed me to see physical education from his perspective and therefore see what at one time was blind to me.

Thank you Jacob!